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Speech and Language

This blog has taken over a week of research to do and I must admit a lot of procrastinating. I think mainly because this area of the boys development scares me. They will be 3 next month and don’t speak. Logan is classed as non-verbal and Lewis has always been making noises and sounds after the SALT (speech and language team) got involved but yesterday he said mummy clear as day whilst looking at me for the very first time. Over the festive break he started saying bye-bye whilst waving. The boys did babble when they were around 9 months then after Both were very unwell with bronchiolitis they just stopped making sounds all together. No babble. Just silence. They spent a year in silence until Kirsty our therapist started coming out to the house every 2 weeks. We had Kirsty for 1 year and I can tell you she made a massive difference in our lives. She taught me that early communication skills do not include speech. There are steps to reach before then.

Most kids start to babble then make sounds then begin to say words. Not needing to give extra thought into the processes that begin to work before actual speech occurs. As you may have guessed it my boys like to be different and we had to start from the complete beginning. From birth to 5 is a critical period for detecting communication difficulties & providing intervention, but studies show as many as 64% of parents are unaware of the early warning signs of speech & language disorders.  Unfortunately, parents are not alone.  Studies show that despite being one of the most common disorders of early childhood, communication disorders are also the least well detected among pediatricians.  More often than not, valuable time is lost between the time a weakness is suspected and a child receives the assessment and intervention services he or she needs.  In this respect though we have been very lucky. By the simple fact that the boys were born so prematurely all eyes have been on them since the moment they were born. They were the neonatal consultants, neurodevelopment consultants as well as physiotherapists and occupational therapists until they reached the age of 2. They were then transferred over to the community paediatric team who have seen them twice since June 2017. As well as the before mentioned SALT intervention due to difficulties with weaning and eating solid foods. All those experts collectively have kept a very close eye on my boys to watch for and treat any delays that occurred. Both boys suffered from brain bleeds when they were born and as much as we know they are delayed due to Prematurity we don’t know how much of this delay is due to the brain bleeds.

So what can parents do to help their children whom they suspect has a speech delay? They should do some research and educate themselves on the signs of common speech and language disorders in children between birth to 4 years of age, an important stage in early detection of communication disorders. No one professional will serve as a better advocate for your child than you, the parent. You know your child better than anyone else in the world. If your gut tells you that something just isn’t right trust your instinct. There is a reason a mothers intuition is so important.

Signs of a Language Disorder:

• Does not smile or interact with others (birth and older)

• Does not babble (4-7 months)

• Makes only a few sounds or gestures, like pointing (7-12 months)

• Does not understand what others say (7 months-2 years)

• Says only a few words (12-18 months)

• Words are not easily understood (18 months-2 years)

• Does not put words together to make sentences (1.5-3 years)

• Has trouble playing and talking with other children (2-3 years)

• Has trouble with early reading and writing skills (2.5-3 years)

If a communication delay is suspected as it was with my boys early intervention is key. Seek advice from your health visitor and/or nursery key worker ASAP. If no one listens to your concerns and continually fobs you off by saying your are too young to be assessed etc just keep raising your concerns. Don’t stop until someone listens. You are not alone.

If you have any helpful hints or tips on how to help your child with early communication difficulties please feel free to comment. Let me know your personal experiences and how you managed to secure the help your child needs and deserves. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have.

As always. Stay cool.

Scottish Twin Mamma

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